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Posted 2017-12-01

Credit Bureaus: The Record Keepers

by Jeannette N. Bennett

If you've taken a personal finance class, listened to the news on radio or television, read articles in the newspaper, or participated in social media, chances are you've seen or heard something about a credit bureau. In fact, the term "credit bureau" is so commonly mentioned that you may have not given much thought to the work and power of credit bureaus and how this affects you.

Posted 2017-11-01

Does International Trade Create Winners and Losers?

by Scott A. Wolla and Anna Esenther

Is trade good for Americans? People seem largely divided on the issue. A 2017 poll found that only 52 percent of Americans feel that trade agreements between the United States and other countries are good for the United States.

Posted 2017-10-02

Treasury Offset Program to the Rescue

by Barbara Flowers

What happens when your expenses are greater than your income? If you don't have savings to make up the difference and it happens for a sustained period of time, you could end up with quite a bit of debt. This can happen to individuals, families, businesses, communities, or even large governments (such as the United States).

Posted 2017-09-01

Why Are Some Countries Rich and Others Poor?

by Scott A. Wolla

Many people mark the birth of economics as the publication of Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations in 1776. Actually, this classic's full title is An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, and Smith does indeed attempt to explain why some nations achieve wealth and others fail to do so.

Posted 2017-05-01

The Economics of Subsidizing Sports Stadiums

by Scott A. Wolla

Professional sports give people pride and a sense of community. But who should pay for the stadiums? From 2008 to 2010, three NFL stadiums were built: the $710 million Lucas Oil Stadium for the Indianapolis Colts, the $1.1 billion AT&T Stadium for the Dallas Cowboys, and the $1.6 billion MetLife Stadium for the New York Jets and Giants.

Posted 2017-04-03

Advertising: Dollars and Decisions

by Jeannette N. Bennett

This lesson received the 2017 Excellence in Financial Literacy Education (EIFLE) Award for Education Program of the Year.

Having dollars in your pocket is one thing; keeping them there is another. With so many businesses selling goods and services, there's a lot of competition in the marketplace for the money in your pocket. In fact, consumers are bombarded with as many as 4,000 to 10,000 advertisements each day!

Posted 2017-03-03

The Productivity Puzzle

by Scott A. Wolla

Have you ever walked through a store and looked closely at where the products are made? If so, you might find yourself wondering if anything is manufactured in the United States anymore. As it turns out, manufacturing output in the United States is near its highest levels ever.

Posted 2017-02-01

Insurance: Managing Risk and Balancing Responsibility with Affordability

by Kris Bertelsen

This lesson received the 2017 Excellence in Financial Literacy Education (EIFLE) Award for Education Program of the Year.

Have you ever wanted to go bungee jumping, hang gliding, or drive a race car? How about skydiving? Nick Cannon would like to try skydiving, but his insurance company doesn’t want him to take the risk. Why would an insurance company be involved in Nick Cannon’s activities?

Posted 2017-03-03

Education, Income, and Wealth

by Scott A. Wolla and Jessica Sullivan

Americans have among the highest living standards in the world and have enjoyed rising living standards for decades. Median household Americans have among the highest living standards in the world and have enjoyed rising living standards for decades. Median household income in the United States in 2015 was $56,516, up from $49,276 in 2010.


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